Keeping the Holidays Happy?! Tips!

“It’s the most wonderful time of the year….” That song just keeps going through my head as I type this. For me, this IS the most wonderful time of the year. I love all the bright lights, good food, and the way that for the most part, people just seem to be a little nicer […]

via Keeping the Holidays Happy – Tips for Dealing With Difficult People — Reclaiming HOPE

Personality Disorders?!

Personality disorders are  psychological conditions that are characterized by a pattern of long term behavior that deviates from societal expectations, and create serious problems in relationships and society. People with personality disorders tend to be inflexible, rigid and manipulative. Although most feel that their behaviors are justified and perfectly fine, they often have a tunnel-vision view of the world and have problems connecting with others in socially acceptable ways.

Personality disorders, Odd or eccentric disorders, Paranoid personality disorder Characterized by suspiciousness and a deep mistrust of people, paranoid personalities often think of others as manipulative, cunning or dishonest. This kind of a person may appear guarded, secretive, and excessively critical.

Schizoid personality disorder, People with schizoid personalities are emotionally distant and tend to prefer to be alone. They are generally immersed in their own thoughts and have little interest in bonding and intimacy with others. Schizotypal personality disorder  is characterized by odd and unusual “magical” beliefs. These individuals may have an eccentric way of behaving or dressing. They also tend to display outlandish beliefs such as believing that they can see the future or travel to other dimensions. People with this condition often have difficulty connecting with others and establishing long term relationships. Overtime, they may develop a fear of social gatherings.

Dramatic, emotional or erratic disorders. Antisocial/psychopath personality disorder.
Individuals with this disorder are known to be manipulative, irresponsible, and have a history of legal difficulties. They show little respect for the rights of others and feel no remorse for their actions. They also leave a trail of unfulfilled promises and broken hearts. Antisocial personalities are also at high risk for drug abuse, alcoholism; meth) since many are “rush” seekers. While they seldom suffer from depression or anxiety, they often use drugs to relieve boredom and irritability.

Borderline personality disorder  are impulsive and have extreme views of people as either “all good” or “bad”. These people are unstable in relationships and have a strong fear of abandonment. They may form an intense personal attachment with someone they barely know and end it without no apparent reason. They might also engage in a “pull” and “push” behavior that usually ends with their partner leaving permanently. Self-mutilation, suicidal gestures or attention-seeking destructive behaviors are not uncommon. Borderline personalities are three times more likely to be female.

Histrionic personality disorder, People with this condition engage in persistent attention-seeking behaviors that include inappropriate sexual behavior and exaggerated emotions. They can be oversensitive about themselves and constantly seek reassurance or approval from others. Excessive need to be the center of attention, low tolerance for frustration, blaming others for failures are also characteristics of the histrionic personality.

Narcissistic personality disorder, Narcissistic personalities have a blown up perception of themselves and an excessive desire for attention and admiration. Individuals with this disorder have a false sense of entitlement and little respect for other people’s feelings. They are oversensitive to criticism and often blame others for their failures.
Prone to outbursts of anger and irritability, the narcissistic personality tends to be manipulative in interpersonal relationships. But deep beneath the surface lies a vulnerable self-esteem, susceptible to depression and feelings of inferiority.

Anxious or fearful disorders, Avoidant personality disorder
This disorder is described by chronic social withdrawal, feelings of inferiority, over-sensitivity and social withdrawal. People with avoidant personality disorder are constantly fearful of rejection and ridicule. They form relationships only with people that they trust. The pain of rejection is so strong that these individuals prefer to isolate rather than risk disappointment.

Dependent personality disorder Individuals with this condition have an abnormal desire to be nurtured that leads to submissive and clinging behavior. Dependent personalities have difficulty making their own decisions and seek others to take over most important areas in their lives. They will often go to great length to obtain nurturance from others, have separation anxiety when alone and desperately seek another partner when a close relationship ends.

Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) Not to be confused with OCD. People with OCPD are perceived as strict and demanding by others. They have a persistent preoccupation with perfectionism, orderliness, and efficiency, at the expense of interpersonal relationships. They also show an excessive devotion to work, productivity and exhibit rigidness and stubbornness. People with OCPD usually have a negative view of life and often become withdrawn and depressed.

TRAMA

You’re afraid to tell people how you feel because it will destroy them. So you bury it deep inside where it destroys you. You are not Worthless. Share your story, Someone needs your story to create their Hope. Lets help one another, to Understand each other. Prayer & Communication are major keys to stepping forward on building Healthy Relationships. There is no right or wrong. No one is perfect. Good Luck! Cheers to Self Care, Love, Forgiveness. Walk your Journey in search of Support. Someone will care to understand. Eventually. Do not Give up!

DIY: Holiday Candles Inspiration

We haven’t hosted Thanksgiving dinner at our house in a very long time. This year, we are hosting again and I’m excited to establish some sort of Thanksgiving tradition with the kids. Zoey is six now and she loves to help out in the kitchen. We’ve already talked about the menu and we are keeping […]

via DIY: Mason Jar Holiday Candleholders —

Vitamin-D Deficiency?

What is the purpose of vitamin D in the body?
Known as the “sunshine vitamin,” vitamin D is a vitamin you can get from food or supplements. Exposure to the sun also stimulates vitamin D production in the skin.
Vitamin D serves several important functions in the body. These include:
promoting calcium absorption, maintaining normal calcium and phosphate levels, promoting bone and cell growth, reducing inflammation. According to Harvard University, an estimated 1 billion people are low in vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiencies can cause short-term symptoms and long-term complications.

What are the symptoms of vitamin D deficiency?
Vitamin D deficiency doesn’t always cause symptoms. When it does, some of the symptoms may include: difficulty thinking clearly, bone pain, frequent bone fractures
muscle weakness. soft bones that may result in deformities, unexplained fatigue
Many people don’t develop symptoms until their vitamin D levels get very low or have been low for some time. This can make the condition difficult to diagnose.

Several factors have contributed to the rising incidence of vitamin D deficiency. These include: wearing sunscreen (sunscreen blocks the sun’s ability to stimulate vitamin D production), not spending enough time outside, having darkly pigmented skin, which won’t absorb the sun’s rays as well , exclusively breast-feeding babies for prolonged time periods, being obese, which typically raises your vitamin D requirements. Some people are born without the ability to process vitamin D. Other people have medical conditions that keep them from digesting vitamin D well.

How is vitamin D deficiency diagnosed?
Your doctor will start by taking your health history to determine if you’ve been experiencing symptoms that could indicate vitamin D deficiency. A doctor will likely order a blood test for the serum concentration of 25(OH)D. This is the type of vitamin D that circulates in the blood. It’s considered a good reflection of how much vitamin D you’ve absorbed from sun exposure and taken in from foods.

Levels of vitamin D are expressed in nanomoles/liter (nmol/L) or nanograms/milliliter (ng/mL). According to the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), the results can indicate the following: deficiency: less than 30 nmol/L (12 ng/mL)
potential deficiency: between 30 nmol/L (12 ng/mL) and 50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL)
normal levels: between 50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL) and 125 nmol/L (50 ng/mL)
high levels: higher than 125 nmol/L (50 ng/mL)

If your vitamin D levels are low and you’re having symptoms of bone pain, a doctor may recommend a special scan to check for bone density . Doctors use this painless scan to evaluate a person’s bone health.

How is vitamin D deficiency treated?
Doctors often treat vitamin D deficiencies by prescribing or recommending vitamin D supplements. The amount you should take usually depends on how low your vitamin D levels are. For example, some people may reach their vitamin D intake by taking a multivitamin. These usually have between 400 and 800 IU of vitamin D with each serving. However, people who are very deficient in vitamin D may need higher levels of supplementation — about 1,000 IU per day.

Ask your doctor how much vitamin D you need every day. The ODS recommends the following dietary allowances for eating foods that contain vitamin D as well as taking supplements: ages 0 to 12 months: 400IU, ages 1 to 70 years (including pregnancy and lactating) 600IU, ages 70 and older: 800IU
Few unfortified foods in a person’s diet are high in vitamin D. Foods that are naturally high in vitamin D include: fatty fish, such as mackerel, salmon, and tuna, beef, cheese, egg yolks, fish liver oils, mushrooms .

However, food manufacturers often add or fortify foods with vitamin D. Examples include: milk, breakfast cereals, yogurt, orange juice, margarine. Manufacturers also add vitamin D to some infant formulas to reduce the risk that infants will have low levels.

It’s also possible to increase vitamin D levels by going outside more. About 15 minutes of sun exposure (without sunscreen on) is usually enough to build up vitamin D levels. Several factors can influence the amount of sun exposure you get, including the time of year, cloud cover, and the time of day (the sun’s rays are more direct during the middle of the day). Another consideration is that ultraviolet B radiation can’t penetrate glass. This type of radiation is what stimulates vitamin D production. So even if you’re taking in sunlight through a window, you won’t get the benefit of vitamin D production.
Sunscreen is still very important to your health. If you’re going to be outside for longer than 15 minutes, you should wear sunscreen to protect against the sun’s damaging rays.

Some steps you can take to maintain healthy vitamin D levels include:
getting out in the sun without sunscreen on for 15 minutes each day
taking a multivitamin that contains vitamin D
eating foods that are high in vitamin D
purchasing and eating foods that are fortified with vitamin D, such as cereals and milk
Eating a healthy diet with fortified foods and getting some sun exposure when possible can help you keep your vitamin D at healthy levels.

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What’s a Disability?

Disability is often defined as any limitation, restriction or impairment which restricts everyday activities and has lasted or is likely to last for at least 6 months, or ones Lifetime. However, disability can be defined in several different ways, depending on the context that the word is used. Disabilities can be very varied.  They can be physical, cognitive, intellectual, mental, sensory, or developmental. They can be present at birth or occur during a person’s lifetime, and can also be permanent or temporary.

There are many different types of disabilities which affect individual people in different ways. 90% of disabilities are not visible, and two people with the same type of disability may not have the same experiences, which loosely fall into  separate categories – intellectual, physical, sensory, and mental illness.

An intellectual disability may mean difficulty communicating, learning, and retaining information. They include Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and developmental delays.

Physical disability may affect, either temporarily or permanently, a person’s physical capacity and/or mobility. They include MS, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, brain or spinal cord injury, epilepsy, and muscular dystrophy.

Sensory disabilities affect one or more senses; sight, hearing, smell, touch, taste or spatial awareness. They include autism, blindness, and hearing loss.

A mental illness affects a person’s thinking, emotional state and behaviors. They include bipolar, depression, schizophrenia, and eating disorders.

Disability and education
36% of people with a disability aged 18-64yrs, have completed Year 12, compared with 60% of those without a disability.
50% of school children with a disability receive additional support including tuition, and access to counsellors or support workers.
25% of people with a profound or severe disability aged 15 – 64 have completed Year 12.

Disability and the community
People with a profound disability are 9 times less likely to participate in activities outside the home.
Nearly 4 in 5 people with disability aged 15-64 years, participated in a cultural, recreational or sporting activity away from home in the previous 12 months (79%).

Childhood disabilities and developmental delays

7% of children have a disability
10% children have a developmental delay
52% of children with disabilities have a profound or severe core-activity limitation
Boys aged 0-14 years are more likely to have a disability (8.8%) than girls (5.0%)
Autism and related mental or behavioral disabilities are the most common disabilities amongst all children
Sensory (sight and hearing), and speech disabilities are the most common disabilities amongst children aged 0-4
66% of children with disabilities attend regular classes in mainstream schools
Just 10% of children with disabilities attend ‘special’ schools
Almost 80% of School principals reported not having enough resources to meet the needs of children with a disability

Mental Health
1 in 5  have a mental illness
Almost half (45%) will experience a mental illness in their lifetime
Women are more likely to have a mental illness than men (22% compared with 18%). However, men had twice the rate of Substance Use disorders (7.0% compared with 3.3%)
The most common mental illnesses are depressive, anxiety and, substance use disorder
More than 10% of people with a mental illness die by suicide within the first 10 years of diagnosis.

Lets all be dedicated to giving people with a disability greater choice, control, and freedom – empowering them to live life on their own terms across the World.

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