Help From Heaven

Who do you trust to help when troubles inevitably come? We need to know before troubles and sorrows come, because as surely as the sun rises in the morning and the moon lights the night sky, trials and tribulations will eventually touch our lives. The first psalm of this new feature called Psalm Wednesday highlights […]

via Psalm Wednesday January 3, 2018 — Help from Heaven

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Why do things go wrong when we’re trying to do what’s right?

I just have to share this. Another lovely blog post from my favorite author Richard Paul Evans and since he is an online friend at Facebook, I have the privilege of being updated with all his writings. It is a true story about his Christmas Box Foundation which helps abused and neglected children. The Christmas […]

via Why Do Things Go Wrong When You’re Trying To Do What Is Right? — DREAMS AND ESCAPES

Keeping the Holidays Happy?! Tips!

“It’s the most wonderful time of the year….” That song just keeps going through my head as I type this. For me, this IS the most wonderful time of the year. I love all the bright lights, good food, and the way that for the most part, people just seem to be a little nicer […]

via Keeping the Holidays Happy – Tips for Dealing With Difficult People — Reclaiming HOPE

What’s a Disability?

Disability is often defined as any limitation, restriction or impairment which restricts everyday activities and has lasted or is likely to last for at least 6 months, or ones Lifetime. However, disability can be defined in several different ways, depending on the context that the word is used. Disabilities can be very varied.  They can be physical, cognitive, intellectual, mental, sensory, or developmental. They can be present at birth or occur during a person’s lifetime, and can also be permanent or temporary.

There are many different types of disabilities which affect individual people in different ways. 90% of disabilities are not visible, and two people with the same type of disability may not have the same experiences, which loosely fall into  separate categories – intellectual, physical, sensory, and mental illness.

An intellectual disability may mean difficulty communicating, learning, and retaining information. They include Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and developmental delays.

Physical disability may affect, either temporarily or permanently, a person’s physical capacity and/or mobility. They include MS, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, brain or spinal cord injury, epilepsy, and muscular dystrophy.

Sensory disabilities affect one or more senses; sight, hearing, smell, touch, taste or spatial awareness. They include autism, blindness, and hearing loss.

A mental illness affects a person’s thinking, emotional state and behaviors. They include bipolar, depression, schizophrenia, and eating disorders.

Disability and education
36% of people with a disability aged 18-64yrs, have completed Year 12, compared with 60% of those without a disability.
50% of school children with a disability receive additional support including tuition, and access to counsellors or support workers.
25% of people with a profound or severe disability aged 15 – 64 have completed Year 12.

Disability and the community
People with a profound disability are 9 times less likely to participate in activities outside the home.
Nearly 4 in 5 people with disability aged 15-64 years, participated in a cultural, recreational or sporting activity away from home in the previous 12 months (79%).

Childhood disabilities and developmental delays

7% of children have a disability
10% children have a developmental delay
52% of children with disabilities have a profound or severe core-activity limitation
Boys aged 0-14 years are more likely to have a disability (8.8%) than girls (5.0%)
Autism and related mental or behavioral disabilities are the most common disabilities amongst all children
Sensory (sight and hearing), and speech disabilities are the most common disabilities amongst children aged 0-4
66% of children with disabilities attend regular classes in mainstream schools
Just 10% of children with disabilities attend ‘special’ schools
Almost 80% of School principals reported not having enough resources to meet the needs of children with a disability

Mental Health
1 in 5  have a mental illness
Almost half (45%) will experience a mental illness in their lifetime
Women are more likely to have a mental illness than men (22% compared with 18%). However, men had twice the rate of Substance Use disorders (7.0% compared with 3.3%)
The most common mental illnesses are depressive, anxiety and, substance use disorder
More than 10% of people with a mental illness die by suicide within the first 10 years of diagnosis.

Lets all be dedicated to giving people with a disability greater choice, control, and freedom – empowering them to live life on their own terms across the World.

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3 Things more Important Than Money?!

We’ve all heard the saying that money doesn’t buy happiness, but is there any truth to it? According to a study, having lots of money doesn’t translate to happiness or satisfaction. In the research, it was found that people who had a high income were not much happier than someone with a low income. It […]

via 3 Things More Important Than Money — simple Ula

Holiday Shopping This Year?! Tips!

Holiday Shopping?! Quick Tips on Saving this Year Friendly Reminders

Start saving Early. There’s no better time than the present to start saving money for the holidays. No matter when you start saving, think about opening a holiday savings account that you can deposit money into all year. 

Set a realistic budget. Figure out exactly how much money you have to spend. And don’t forget to factor in wrapping paper, holiday cards and postage. The little extras that are often forgotten are just the things that can throw your entire budget off track if you’re not careful.

Make your holiday shopping list. After your budget has been set and you’ve started saving, it’s a good idea to create a list of everyone you intend to buy for. Don’t forget to include items like hostess gifts for parties you’ll attend, a gift for your boss and that family gift exchange you’re included in year after year. It also may be smart to purchase a few small gifts for surprise visitors or a last-minute party. Once you’ve made your list, keep it handy so you can refer to it often. The list will help you stay on track and keep you from forgetting anyone. 

Do your homework. There’s nothing worse than buying a gift at full price, only to see that another retailer is selling it cheaper. Before you hit the stores, do your homework and compare prices for the gifts you know you want to buy. From newspaper ads to online shopping that offers free shipping and other holiday deals, do your research and create a “plan of attack” to help your money stretch.

Count down to the holidays. There’s no better motivation to get your holiday shopping done on time than to make a countdown to the holidays and put it somewhere you can see it. That way you’ll always know exactly how long you have to finish shopping and get gifts wrapped and sent, if needed.

Get a head start. It’s much easier to make smart choices with your money when you’re not waiting until the last minute to shop. Procrastinating only promotes rushed shopping, overspending and buyer’s remorse as the guilt of going over budget sets in. So, get a head start and begin your holiday shopping early enough to take your time and make smart choices.

Be thoughtful. When in doubt about a gift to give, get creative and be thoughtful. Think about your most cherished gifts throughout the years. They’re probably some of the most thoughtful gifts you’ve received. For instance, a scrapbook of shared memories or an appreciation book may take a little more effort or time, but they’re certainly thoughtful and creative. And they’re often less expensive, too.

If all else fails, give a gift card. If you’ve had trouble finding the perfect gift or you simply run out of time, give the gift that everyone’s sure to enjoy. A gift card is the ideal gift for anyone on your holiday shopping list. 

Make a payoff plan. If you were able to save some money throughout the year to help lighten the financial burden when the holidays roll around, great. If not, make a plan to pay off the money you’ve spent once the new year arrives. It’s important that you set a financial strategy that works for you and your budget.

Ready, set, shop. After you’ve made your list, set your budget and done your homework, you’re ready to shop until you drop. It’s a great feeling to hit up the stores you need and start checking items off your list. And remember, the holidays are a great time to take advantage of price-match guarantees, free shipping and other end-of-year deals. 

These holiday shopping and savings tips are sure to help you slow down and enjoy the holidays for what they’re meant to be – a special time to spend with your loved ones. Avoid holiday hassle by finding a bank that offers the flexibility you need to help keep all of your finances in order - during the holidays and the rest of the year.

Happy Holiday Shopping!!!

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